Calculating The Value of Facebook Fans in Higher Ed: Statistics

This article is part three of a larger series on Calculating the value of your Facebook fans as a college or university. To read the other articles in this series, scroll to the bottom of this article to navigate to them.

Syncapse performed a survey on 20 top corporate brands on Facebook, collecting data from over 4,000 people in order to derive the following statistics, which are equally valuable for Higher Education. The primary takeaway was this: “People who are fans are more valuable to organizations than consumers who are not fans.”

  • Fans are 28% more likely than non-fans to continue “using” the brand.
  • Fans are 41% more likely than non-fans to recommend a fanned school to their friends.
  • An average fan may participate with a brand ten times a year and will make one recommendation.
  • An active fan may participate thirty times and make ten recommendations.

The other metric which didn’t apply to higher ed in my opinion was “product spending”. Synapse concluded that on average, fans spend an additional $71.84 on products for which they are fans, compared to those who are not fans. Since Higher Ed doesn’t sell a product in that sense, what is higher ed’s primary measurement of success?

Another statistics that Syncapse was able to conclude from their study were:

  • On average, Facebook fans are 28% more likely to continue using a brand than are non-fans.

This highlights the value of not just having short-term marketing campaigns on campus, but instead, incorporating a healthy mix of long-term marketing efforts to help sustain the fans that will continue to use your brand over time. One example would be to reward students who have been a fan of your institution’s Facebook Page for a certain amount of time. They could be rewarded with exclusive access to events around campus or other perks.

  • On average, Facebook Fans were 41% more likely to recommend a product than their non-fan counterparts.

Another measurement that we found Syncapse concluded that was relevant to higher ed was the impact that “Fanning” or “Liking a Page” had on others.

  • 38% of respondents reported that they would likely become a fan of a brand if they saw a family member or close friend do so.
  • 34% of respondents reported that they would likely become a fan of a brand if they saw a person they know through Facebook do so.

The last metric we pulled from the report involved Brand Affinity.

  • 81% of Fans said they feel connection/empathy with the brand.
  • Only 39% of non-fans said they feel connection/empathy with the brand.
  • 87% of Fans said they felt warmth, gratitude, happy or satisfied with the brand.
  • Only 49% of Fans said they felt warmth, gratitude, happy or satisfied with the brand.

Read Part 1 of the series.

Read Part 2 of the series.